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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 443 (some duplicates have been removed)
the release of the lockerbie bomber. what the u.s. asked scotland to do with the man who killed almost 200 americans. and they were planning their daughter's funeral when suddenly -- >> -- we made a mistake. abby is alive. >> we're still in shock. >> shepard: tonight, one family's miracle leaves another in mourning. first this monday night 92,000 documents on the war in afghanistan. the bottom line? we're not winning. the taliban are stronger than they have been since 2001. and pakistan? evidence that pakistan's intelligence agency is helping the enemy. the u.s. government gives pakistan more than $1 billion a year to help fight the taliban. and, instead, documentation of the pakistani government actually working with the militants who were trying to kill u.s. forces in afghanistan. the classified documents posted on the web site wiki leaks. its founder a few weeks ago gave them to newspapers including the "new york times" so that they could analyze the files before they were posted. the "new york times" reports the documents reveal among other things pakistan let members of the spy servic
. >> the lockerbie bombing. the u.s. senator in charge of the inquiry said his committee will come to britain for answers. ferry in the u.s. military over the afghan wikileaks. >> the truth must come first. first the truth because without the truth, no public policy is going to work. >> hello. the oil giant bp announced a multibillion-dollar losses and in the wake of the gulf of mexico spill. it also has a new chief executive to take over from beleaguered -- beleaguered boss tony hayward. the company has allocated more than $72 billion to cover the cost of the spill. this is cold comfort to be thousands of people whose lives have been blighted by the disaster. as peter marshall reports from louisiana, bp may be in for one of the biggest and longest battles in oil spill history. >> people say the petrochemical industry is just as dangerous. there are a lot of industries that are dangerous. this is just unsafe. >> by nature, and he is attacks and the thrill seeker. he is a profession of lawyer. he is about to swoop on to bp. and jump ♪ad >> bp has a routine of taking more risks and and their
the united states. he's also attacking u.s. troops in afghanistan. >> we've almost called venus the forest gufrp of the jihad in the sense that he seemed to find this way to get himself involved in operations or attacks that seem way beyond a 20-some-odd convert from long island should be involved in. >> an american so radical iezed, so dangerous, he's willing to help al qaeda plot bombings that could kill his own friends and even his own family on long island. >> in a conventional war you have companies, you have divisions, you have brigades, you have battalions. in this war, every single person counts. every sickle person that goes over there like him is somebody we can't miss. >> but the tables could be turning on al qaeda. their one-time secret weapon could be spilling their secrets. family, friends, and intelligence officials are left wondering why and how did bryant turn into a terrorist. who convinced him to wage jihad against his neighbors? my search for answers begins about an hour's drive from new york city where bryant kneel venus was born to the suburbs of long island where his
in u.s. history threaten to undermine support pour the war in afghanistan. >> more than 90,000 documents leaked to a whistle-blower site than official records have ever portrayed. >> this morning, the white house and pentagon are in damage control mode. nick schifrin is in kabul. we begin with john hendren in washington. >> reporter: good morning. most of the tens of thousands of documents are what's called raw intelligence submitted by junior officers. but u.s. intelligence, as well as everyone else are now sifting through them. this flood of documents was written through january 2004 to january 2009. underfunded and undersupported, despite a taliban insurgency at that growing strongerer and fiercer. the white house immediately condemned the leak saying those conditions were exactly why the president announced a new strategy and a troop surge this year. still, the white house is struggling to stem the damage. >> it will create a lot of tension. the national security adviser just put out a release saying this thanes national security. there's a lot ever detail in this. not
at the massive leak of classified or documents. the u.s. defense secretary calls in the fbi. >> the battlefield consequences of the release of these documents are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, our allies, and afghan partners. >> the worst infanticide in french history. a woman admits secretly killing eight of her babies. tombs of the unknown soldiers. puree in the u.s. over thousands of mislabeled graves at arlington national cemetery. >> welcome to bbc, forecasting to our viewers in the u.k. and around the world. the u.s. defense secretary robert gates has called in the fbi to look into the leaking of more than 90,000 classified military documents. the documents published on the wikileaks web site on sunday gave confidential information about the afghanistan war. >> u.s. forces depend daily on information from afghan civilians as they try to defeat the taliban in afghanistan. some might give information openly. others more secretly as spies. none expected earnings to be published on the internet. the dossier exposed this week include names, addresses, and fathers names comin
are fueling new suspicion and outrage about pakistan's links to the taliban. is a key u.s. ally playing a role in the deaths of american troops? i'm going to ask pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. about these disturbing allegations. >>> and the case of the disappearing oil. why officials in the gulf say they are not finding much crude left on the water surface? wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux and you're in "the situation room." >>> well, some are calling it one of the biggest leaks in u.s. military history. in the league of the pentagon papers. those revelations about the vietnam war. but today the white house contends that there isn't much new in the thousands of afghan war logs posted online by the group wikileaks. some powerful members of congress, well, they're not so sure. they say the documents raised some serious questions about u.s. policy toward afghanistan and neighboring pakistan. i want to begin with our senior white house correspondent ed henry and what was startling and what was -- stood out in my mind when i saw the white house today was that they are not saying t
. >> good evening, lester. it looks like one more job will be lost to the oil spill and u.s. government officials say it is the position of ceo of bp. a post held by tony hayward since 2007 until apparently very soon. since the oil started gushing back in april, bp has tried to weather its own storm surrounding it. and ceo tony hayward as the public face of the company has only made waves. >> i'm not stonewalling. >>> he stated that the size of the spill is tiny compared to the size of the gulf of mexico. while the crisis roiled, he attended a yacht race and then these memorable words. >> i'd like my life back. >> well, now it looks like he has it. reportedly, bp's board has been negotiating his departure and he may resign as early as tomorrow. one day before the board is set to announce a huge second quarter loss. bp is saying mr. hayward remains the chief executive officer and has the full confidence of our board and senior management. calling the reports just rumors and speculation. on the front lines today, boats that had to leave ahead of the storm are back. to continue preparing t
new questions about the war in afghanistan and whether a key u.s. ally is helping the enemy. i'm katie couric. also tonight an exclusive cbs news interview with the president of iran. mahmoud ahmadinejad denies he's aiding the taliban and accuses president obama of snubbing him. a shake-up is expected to put an american in charge of b.p. while tony heyward could walk away with an ocean of severance pay. and steve hartman takes the temperature of the nation and finds we're running hot. >> i wish it were winter. >> reporter: and cold. >> i love the heat. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the obama administration is dealing with a serious breach of national security tonight. tens of thousands of classified documents about the war in afghanistan leaked and posted on the web. at a time when more than 60% of americans believe the war is not going well, the documents provide some evidence to back that up. more than 91,000 were leaked to wikileaks dot-org which put 76,00
's intelligence service is directly helping the taliban that is killing u.s. soldiers in afghanistan. white house correspondent is at the pentagon tonight with the details. u.s. officials are assessing the damage after the leak of 91,000 classified from january of 2004 to december of 2009. the information released by an antiwar website is described by the military as "secret battlefield reports," which are critical of pakistan intelligence helping the insurgency suggesting that taliban have been equipped with missiles and contain information of civilian casualties. at the white house an effort to say that while there are national security concerns about the massive leak, there is nothing terribly new. >> the content as much as it is their names, their operations, logistics, sources, all of that information out in a public way has the potential to do harm. >> the u.s. has expressed anger at pakistan for allowing al qaeda and taliban to have safe haven on the soil and frustration not not taking the fight to them but the former head of the c.i.a. says the u.s. wanted too much. >> for us to expect th
. >> reporter: the avalanche of documents, most of them classified secret, shows how the u.s. has been losing the war in afghanistan one day at a time. >> the real story of this material is that it's war. it's one damned thing after another. >> reporter: julian assange the head of wikileaks which posted the documents on the web hopes researchers will mine them for a real picture of the war. this new trove covers six years of war in afghanistan through kind of reports both accurate and inaccurate every commander receives at his morning briefing. >> small arms fire and rpg. >> reporter: for instance, this report of the first use of the heat-seeking surface-to- air missile against an american aircraft. a weapon that would cripple u.s. air power if the taliban ever got them in large numbers. most of the reports document what is already well known. for years the u.s. has not had enough troops in afghanistan. resulting in this record of a remote outpost calling for help as they are nearly overrun. we are taking casualties. enemy in the wild. the afghan government has been corrupt and inefficient. a
and expertise in a range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> at the u.s. steps up efforts to find those behind a leak of military secrets. presidents karzai say it puts afghan formants in danger. >> we consider that concern -- we consider that extremely irresponsible. >> the british prime minister and his trip to india defending his comments about pakistan's record on tackling terrorism. we report from the heart of the terrorist threat -- a town plagued by suicide bombings. >> people tell us is important that we should not say -- should not stay in any one place for about 20 minutes for our own safety. it has become one of the most dangerous places in pakistan. >> welcome to "bbc world news" broadcast on pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up later for you -- a french woman admits killing eight of her newborn babies, trying to hide the births from her husband. and the new starlet of indian cinema with a famous father talks about turning jane austen and to a bollywood blockbuster. >> in the first afghan government reaction to the wikileaks inv
they're raising new questions about u.s. military strategy and whether pakistan, america's critical ally in the region, has been aiding the enemy. a live report is just ahead. >>> fast moving storms spawning tornadoes and cutting paths of destruction from the midwest to the northeast. homes have been torn apart and trees knocked down. live in the extreme weather center with where the threat is this morning. >>> and the "a.m. fix" blog is up and running. join the live conversation right now. just go to cnn.com/amfix. >>> but first, day 98 of the gulf oil spill and it may be tony hayward's last. the company could announce that he is done during a keyboard meeting in london today. many residents of the gulf coast say his words were salt on an already gushing wound and he became the poster boy for bad press saying the spill was relatively tiny, the environmental impact would be small, that he wanted his own life back when 1 people died in the initial disaster. phil beck is live at bp headquarters in london in morning. do we know if we're going to hear anything about tony hayward's futur
." leaking secrets about the afghan conference, u.s. documents reveal nearly 200 civilians were killed in unreported incidents. the papers show evidence that iran and pakistan supported the taliban insurgency. >> fiction that is being sold as intelligence. >> guilty of crimes against humanity, the first conviction of the khmer rouge regime in cambodia. permission to leave, the head of bp, the company still struggling to bring an end to the gulf of mexico oil spill. what are the latest sanctions due to be imposed by the european union? hello, welcome to "gmt." the leak of secret military documents, killed by nato forces but never reported. more than 90,000 military records offer a glimpse into the raw intelligence gathered in afghanistan from 2004 to 2009. publishing confidential documents on the internet, the guardian newspaper in britain, new york times, were given to -- given advance access. first, this report from family you can in. >> a massive picture of war without the public relations block. the failures of the afghan campaign have been revealed for the first time. this whistleb
of the guided states, he was told today is a free man. he is wanted in the u.s. in connection with his conviction of having sex with a 13 year-old girl 30 years ago. swiss authorities say the u.s. did not make a convincing argument for his extradition. >> two months in a swiss jail, eight months under house arrest at his luxury shall lay in the alps, and less heat legal wrangling, but now switzerland has finally decided what to do about roman polanski. >> this morning, i have informed the lawyer of mr. polanski and informed the ambassadors of the united states, france and poland. it is also the case that the freedom restricting measures against mr. polanski have been lifted. that is the electronic monitoring has been detached. >> it is nonsensical that an extradition demand should be formulated. it was based on information and facts that are erroneous, full of lies, and as mr. polanski rights on the only occasion he broke his silence, he feels he has already been punished. >> the decision not to extradite roman polanski is based, this was say, on continued confusion over how long his o
of spying for the west in exchange for the suspects arrested in the u.s. the climate conundrum. some of the world's most influential scientists are clear of hiding key data to exaggerate global warming. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. my name is mike embly. coming up -- the israeli group is proving a big hit in broadway and london. and fighting for a place for the final, germany and spain are head to head in the world cup semis. britain has confirmed its troops are being moved out in the african province of hellmund, where they have taken casualties. thared of all losses have been there. american forces will take over. it's been described as a redeployment. the taliban are likely to portray it as a victory for them. bbc correspondent jonathan beal has this report. >> it's one of the most lethal places on the planet. this is sangy, scene of the heaviest british fighting and where they suffered the heaviest casualties. is this small stretch of lush, greenland is also fertile ground for drug smuggling corruption and the
at the u.s. justice department from 2000-2006. currently senior director for mississippi river and east coast center for rivers and deltas, part of the environmental defense fund, senior direct there are. and as we look at restoration, mr. harrison, what's the prescription from your area? if you don't quite know how bad it is yet, how are you going to get your head around how to restore things? what's your process going to be? guest: well, one of the things that people need to remember about the louisiana wetlands in particular and the gulf of mexico is that these are places where environmental damage has been happening for the past 80, 100 years. you can take the louisiana wetlands, for example, because we made some decisions on how we manage the mississippi river, the wetlands are actually the delta of the mississippi river. this is where the river comes down, it's draining 41% of the united states, it's eroding all that land and sediment. and it buills this land mass, where new orleans sits. it's where the fishing communities are. and it's an ongoing battle between the gulf of mexico
of spying in the west in exchange for suspects arrested in the u.s.. some of the world's most influential scientists are cleared of hiding key data to exaggerate global warming. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, they are blind and deaf, and this is really theater group is a big hit on broadway and in london. and spain celebrants' making it to the world cup final, beating germany 1-0. -- and spain celebrates making it to the world cup final, beating germany, 1-0. >>> hello. britain has confirmed its troops are being moved out of an afghan province of homeland, where the have taken heavy casualties. 1/3 of all british losses have been in helmand province. american forces will take over in far greater numbers, described officially as the redeployment. the taliban as likely to portray it as a victory for them. frank gardner has this report. >> more than 90 britons have died fighting here. it is by far the most dangerous place to serve, or roadside bombs and cyprus and the cliffs eclipsed much of the progress. soon, it will be ameri
be on his orders. he also condemned the leak of u.s. military documents, revealing names of afghans working to defeat the taliban. >> they are lives, and those lives could be endangered. therefore, we consider that extremely irresponsible, and an act we cannot overlook. >> is this the fine line between diplomacy and honesty? david cameron defense of remorse about pakistan on his trip to india. the heat is on for arizona, the court ruling blocks of the new laws against immigration. warning about historical the low levels of plankton, feeding into the climate debate. hello, and welcome. the afghan president, karzai, is pulling no punches. he has urged the u.s.-led allies to take stronger actions about terrorist sanctuary's beyond his orders -- in clear reference to pakistan. only the international committee was capable of actually doing something about it, he said. he also condemned the recent leak of u.s. military documents. >> the afghan government has been cautious until now about commenting, since the avalanche of material appeared on the website this week by wikileaks. those of publish t
on all that's gone wrong. mounting u.s. casualties, civilian casualties, afghan government corruption and claims that pakistan is helping the taliban. >> the fact is the revelation of these documents, these raw reports real he'll brings to the foreall of the core challenges that we've been facing in afghanistan for a number of years. >> reporter: the war funding bill now goes to the president for his signature, but it only funds the war for a few months so another big battle over paying for the war in afghanistan is just around the corner, katie. >> couric: this question probably reflects what a lot of americans are wondering given the fact that the u.s. gives pakistan billions of dollars in aid every year. that is, can pakistan even be called a partner at this point? >> well, despite all those claims in the wikileaks documents the white house says yes. number one they say because relations have improved significantly over the last year. number two, they say because no other country has done as much to help the united states eliminate al qaeda terrorists from the battlefield. katie. >
the website did not come to the u.s. military and say here's what we got. is this sensitive information. hears more from the pentagon spokesman. >> i don't know where they would possibly have the expertise warehoused within in website to render judgment on whether or not the documents could adversely impact our forces or coalition partners are. >> after covering this building and the white house, leaks within the top levels of the u.s. government make government officials crazy,. >> shepard: of course but we're not talking about the substance. part of the substance, mike, is that the pakistanis have been helping the afghanistan insurgents trying to kill and do kill american and coalition forces. what are they saying about these accusations regarding pakistan? >> at the pentagon they're careful because the fact it's listed on a website doesn't mean it's no longer classified. at the white house, robert gibbs went out of his way to say the information released has been talked about u.s. officials publicly. there are concerns about pakistan and whether pakistan was taking the fight to the enemy in
. some of the documents ripped the cover off the u.s.-led war effort in afghanistan. they tell a story that some veterans of the region know full well. more civilian deaths than are ever reported, unexplained american deaths, questionable battlefield tactics and a mission just not going that well. this comes just as the u.s., of course, is gearing up this new push in the conflict. we have two reports to start off with tonight. first, our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. jim, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. this massive leak provides incredible detail and insight into the u.s. war in afghanistan. day by day, battle by battle it's a tough look at the worst of the war. the staggering mountain of documents, nearly 92,000, covers a six-year stretch of the war ending last december when the u.s. war effort was failing and the taliban was on the rise. the secret documents were released by the whistleblower website wikileaks and its founder, julian assange. >> the real story of this material is that it's war. it's one damn thing after another. it is the continuous small
's u.s. ambassador about the airliner crash that killed 152 people, and she examines u.s./pakistani relations after the leak of thousands of secret military documents. >> ifill: we ask environmental engineer nancy kinner to track what's happened to the oil in the water. 100 days after the gulf disaster. >> lehrer: and spencer michels tells the story of a one-man mission to help clean up the oil in louisiana. >> a private individual has taken it upon himself to try to protect the barrier islands in the gulf of mexico. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that zero emission technologies to breathing a little easier, while taking 4.6 million truckloads off the road every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
in a moment. >>> north korea ups the ante in the war if the u.s. has war games with the south koreans. we'll tell you about it straight ahead. what you d at this morning's meeting? that was pure poetry. stop it. hello? you spotted a milli dollar accounting error that no one else noticed. that was pretty sweet. but you did have eight layers of sweet crunchy back up. what can i s? you're the man. or -- you know, the little dude. that's me. [ female announcer ] stop mid-morning hunger with kellogg's® frosted mini-wheats® cereal. an excellent source of fiber from 100% whole grain that helps you stay full, so yon stay focused. also, try chocolate little bites. so, how'd the meeting go? outstanding, i wowed them with my chocolate chip center. and at holiday inn express, you always can. holiday inn express. stay you. and stay rewarded with the hit it big promotion-- earn up to $500 dollars at over 300 retailers. of. >>> we're back in new york city. before we go forward on the next topic, i want to bring in noelle who is in arkansas. we ran out of time. i want to get your thoughts about the sta
the stage for the largest russia-u.s. spy swap since the cold war. in new york, 10 people plead guilty to spying. allegations of a bomb plot in norway. three men arrested on suspicion of links to al qaeda. thousands rally at the solidarity march for captured israeli soldier to return to jerusalem. a warm welcome to bbc world news, broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you, could this be the future of air travel? the plane powered by the energy of the sun. and fifa promises action over the refereeing mistakes at this world cup. the bbc is told they'll be changed in time for 2014. >> in a new york court, 10 people accused of spying for russia have pleaded guilty and ordered deported. it seems to be part of a prisoner swap between the american and russian government, the largest since the cold war. a u.s. prosecutor says russia agreed to release a number of prisoners, it's believed up to four. >> this evening, in a new york court, the final pieces of a spy swap looked to be falling in place. the 10 people arrested last week as russian undercover spies appea
of industries. of what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> u.s. allies have taken -- u.s. and allies have taken stronger action against terrorists. a woman admits killing eight of her newborn babies trying to hide it from her husband. welcome to "bbc world news." >> u.s. forces depend daily on information from afghan civilians as they try to defeat the taliban in afghanistan. some might give him information openly come others, more secure the as spies. but none expect their names to be published on the internet. the dossier expose this week includes names, addresses and father's name is, in direct contradiction to the claims that they have withheld documents that might risk lives. the afghan government has been cautious until now about commenting on the avalanche of information that appeared on line. but president karzai had been particularly shocked by the way the name of informants had been left in. >> these names were put into these documents without been blacked out. to put this, indeed, is extremely irresponsible and -- >> this, indeed, is extremely irresponsible and
" was granted early access to the document and says they also suggest the u.s. feared pakistan may have actually helped the taliban. in a statement sunday, national security adviser general james jones called the leak a threat to national security, which could put the lives of americans and our partner at risk. the documents are largely what's called raw intelligence, reports from junior officers in the field that analysts use to advise policymakers. the website first gained international attention in april when it posted this classified helicopter cockpit video of a 2007 attack in baghdad. the clip apparently shows u.s. army helicopters firing on suspected insurgents. among the dead were believed to be two journalist. the u.s. military has charged bradley manning with passing along the information. as for this latest leak, one u.s. official says it may take days to comb through all of the documents and figure out exactly how much damage has been done. and the site says the document, quote, don't generally cover top-secret operations and they say they are delaying the release of 15,000 other doc
intensifies for missing u-s soldiers. the trade the >>> a soldier is laid to rest. the search intensifies for a missing u.s. sailor. the trade the taliban is calling for. >>> i was traumatized. i started crying. >>> a young girl killed in a bay area fire. why neighbors fear they will see more of these tragedies. >>> the report that's he is stepping down. what we know about a shakeup at the top of bp. i'm ann notarangelo. the news starts right now. a funeral today for a napa soldier killed in afghanistan earlier this month. the funeral comes as concern grows about the american sailors missing in afghanistan. don knapp is here with the latest. >> reporter: it's shaping up to be the deadliest month in afghanistan for u.s. troops. as the search continues for two u.s. sailors believed captured by the taliban. he was a napa high school grad and at the time of his death in afghanistan, at 21 years of age, army specialist chase stanley served a 15 month tour in iraq. he was killed july 14th when an ied destroyed their vehicle. kyle davenport served with him from day one in the army th
. president obama led a chorus of concern over the huge disclosure of classified u.s. military documents about the war in afghanistan. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, two takes on the document dump. first, senators jack reed and kit bond assess what it could mean for the war effort. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to david leigh of the "guardian" and media watcher alex jones on the journalism impact. >> ifill: holly pattenden of "business monitor international" in london looks at the corporate shake-up at b.p. >> lehrer: tom bearden reports from the alabama gulf coast on kenneth feinberg and the complicated mission of compensation. >> and the lead is still tied up they still compensation hasn't been forth coming. >> when i was a young person working in these places, didn't see a way out. and i certainly didn't think the way out would be this. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corpor
until i have confidence that u.s. taxpayer money is not being abused to line the pockets of corrupt afghan government officials, g drug lords and terrorists. can you respond, first of all, to the allegation that people with political connections are getting off? >> that's not true. we have prosecuted a number of high ranking officials in the afghan government. that process will continue. every government official, high ranking official is now required to -- there's a lot of misinformation. for instance, that report by nita lowey tt came out was related to the flow of cash out of kabul airport. the fact is that out of the $19.6 million that the united states is giving to afghanistan in the past three years, only $1 billi billion, 5% of the money has been given to the afghan government. there is waste. there is corruption. but a lot of it has nothing to do with the afghan government. it is the -- >> what's worrisome, i think, to congress, to americans, is that it's not, oh, there's corruption in government. because governments do have their corruption parts. it's that the president
cooperating with the taliban. documents show u.s. special opposite forces targeted militants without trial. records detail multiple civilian deaths at the hand of coalition troops that were previously unreported. the wikileaks honcho charged the documents appear to indicate war crimes. >> it's clear it will shape an understanding of what the past six years of war has been like and the course of the war needs to be changed. >> the white house, great britain's government and pakistan have condemned the released of those classified documents. afghan government says it's shocked, but the information is mostly old. nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff joins me now. what is most damaging to the american administration's in terms of these released documents? >> i think the details about the pakistani intelligence services cooperation with elements of the taliban and the hakani it in work. these are enemies of the united states and afghanistan, enemies of the cia. we've been trying to kill these people. what the documents show, reflects long-standing concerns by many eleme
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 443 (some duplicates have been removed)